Wayne State University

Aim Higher

Brown Bag Colloquium Series

Humanities Center has scheduled talks to be held during the Fall and Winter semesters. These talks are held mainly on Tuesday and Wednesday, but occasionally on other weekdays as well. All lectures will be held in 2339 FAB from 12:30 - 1:30 unless otherwise announced.

Since the inception of the weekly Brown Bag Colloquium Series, literally hundreds of Wayne State humanities and arts faculty and students have participated either as speakers or as members of the audience. Each new year brings an increase in the number of faculty volunteering to present talks. As a result, the Center regularly hosts talks twice a week throughout the academic year. Brown Bag talks are free and open to the public. We are inviting junior and senior scholars in the humanities and arts as well as those working in the natural and social sciences whose work overlaps with the humanities.

Please click here for the schedule

Schedule

  • September
  • October
  • November
  • December
  • January
  • February
  • March
  • April

September 12 - Stephen M. Lanier
Research, Professor of Pharmacology and Vice President for Research

Integrative Sciences and Engagement

Bio: Stephen M. Lanier (SML) received his doctorate in pharmacology from the University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences (Mentor – K. U. Malik) and received postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Charles Homcy and Robert Graham at Harvard Medical School in the Cardiac Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, which was under the direction of Edgar Haber. SML was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and continued his research in the Cardiac Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. In 1991, he was recruited to the Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Lanier accepted the position of Chair of the Department of Pharmacology at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans in 2001. He served as the Chief Scientific Officer, Associate Provost for Research and Professor of Pharmacology at the Medical University of South Carolina December 1, 2006 to June 15, 2014. On June 16th 2014, SML was appointed as Professor of Pharmacology and Vice President for Research at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan.

In each of his various institutional leadership roles, SML has enhanced research support operations, augmented entrepreneurial initiatives, developed new research infrastructure, nurtured growth in extramural research funding, developed strong community ties and developed significant inter-institutional collaborations and partnerships involving the public and private sector.

SML is recognized as a leading investigator in the area of cell signaling and signal integration in health and disease and his work has been supported by the National Institutes of Health for almost 30 years. His work has led to the development of new concepts in the field of cell signaling and has resulted in the generation of a number of new concepts in the field as well as a range of tools and resources that are widely used in the research community.

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September 13 - Ollie Johnson
African American Studies, Chair and Associate Professor

New Perspectives on Afro-Latin American Politics

Abstract: This presentation highlights new scholarship on Afro-Latin American Politics. The recent passing of Fidel Castro and expected retirement of his brother Raul Castro have raised expectations that a new political opening may soon emerge in Cuba. The recent political coup in Brazil and the conviction of popular former president Luiz Ignacio Lula da Silva on corruption charges have created a much more pessimistic feeling regarding Brazilian politics. I will explore the prospects for increased Black activism in Cuba, Brazil, and throughout the region. Recent research suggests that there is an Afro-Cuban racial identity and consciousness that could be mobilized politically if the system allowed it. In Brazil, Black political activists and politicians have been central to the critique of the myth of racial democracy and the emergence of affirmative action and other policies of social inclusion. What do recent political developments in Latin American tell us about contemporary politics in Afro-Latin America?

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September 19 - Mary Herring
Political Science, Associate Professor

Gender Dynamics of Political Conversation: A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Discussion

Abstract: Despite the stereotype that women are more talkative than men, when the topic involves political matters, women are less likely to engage in discussion with family, friends, acquaintances, or co-workers. This gender gap is found in a wide variety of settings including state legislatures and congressional hearings. Scholars point to the nature of classroom discussion as an important causal mechanism in perpetuating and intensifying this gender gap, arguing that where men dominate classroom discussions, both sexes internalize the social standing of the sexes. With the emergence of the Internet and social media as forums for discussion and with the rising popularity of online and blended instruction, my colleagues and I ask whether the relative anonymity of online conversations diminishes the gender disparity observed in face-to-face settings.

Using volunteers drawn from a student research participation pool, this study compares the dynamics of online discussion, which are treated as the experimental condition, with the control condition of face-to-face discussion. Analysis focuses on “voice” variables, such as mean words spoken or posted, number of turns taken, and proportion of discussion contributed by each participant. Frederic Vultee (Department of Communication, WSU), Jennie Sweet-Cushman (Chatham University), and Elizabeth Prough (Madonna University) are co-investigators in this research.

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September 20 - Elena Past
Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Associate Professor and Associate Chair

Fire and Ice: Northern Nature, Southern Neighbors, and the Environmental Humanities in Paolo Sorrentino’s Youth

Abstract: Paolo Sorrentino, an award-winning director from Naples, has twice left Italy to film on location in Alpine Switzerland, once to make the film The Consequences of Love (2004) and later to make the film Youth (2015). The Swiss Alps happen to be a landscape of global financial power (the World Economic Forum is held each year in Davos, Switzerland, setting of Youth), and these Swiss films seem, at first glance, to be about privileged, isolated individuals experiencing existential crises. In an ecocritical reading of Youth, I suggest that this quirky film can also help us trace anxieties about the future of the planet, about climate change, and about cinema’s possible role in a climate-changed future. I think through the back-and-forth between elemental, social, and political forces, focusing on the petroleum fires that fuel cinema and the melting ice of the Alpine glaciers. Ultimately, I propose that we can follow our contemporary environmental crisis through all kinds of art forms. In the age of the Great Acceleration, it is time to change everything, as Naomi Klein urges: even the way we read media that may not intend to say anything at all about climate change.

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September 26 - Jaime Goodrich, English, Associate Professor; Graham Hukill, University Libraries, Digital Publishing Librarian; Cynthia Krolikowski, University Libraries, Librarian IV and Special Collections Librarian:

Dividing the Kingdoms: Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates

Abstract: In academic year 2016-17, an interdisciplinary team of Wayne State University faculty, staff, and students produced “Dividing the Kingdoms: Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates” (http://guides.lib.wayne.edu/folgerkinglear). This digital suite of teaching resources for college instruction of Shakespeare was Wayne State’s contribution to “Teaching Shakespeare to Undergraduates,” a micro-grant sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library and the National Endowment for Humanities. “Dividing the Kingdoms” consists of modules showcasing five different methodologies for teaching Shakespeare (adaptation, cultural studies, performance, philosophy, textual studies). To complement these modules, the WSU Libraries digitized early printings of King Lear, Shakespeare’s sources, and a later dramatic adaptation. An additional set of activities showcases digital humanities approaches to these texts. The site also houses footage of acclaimed Chicago actor Larry Yando, who filmed a 30-minute master class on performing Lear and a 45-minute Q&A about Shakespeare and acting. Finally, the site features sample syllabi and examples of student work, including a series of short videos where Yando coaches undergraduates from Wayne State’s Theatre program. This presentation provides an overview and discussion of the project.

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September 27 - Barry Lyons
Anthropology, Associate Professor

Using Film to Communicate Climate Change

Abstract: About half of Republican voters are white evangelicals who do not believe the earth’s climate is in crisis. A small but growing movement of evangelicals is working to change this, calling on evangelicals to “care for creation”. In consultation with “creation care” advocates, I am developing a film project to present stories of evangelical Christians in the global South and the United States who are grappling with climate change and its effects. I filmed this summer in a region in highland Ecuador where North American missionaries began to convert Kichwa-speaking indigenous people in the 1960s. Evangelical indigenous farmers showed me how excessive rains had rotted their fava beans and damaged their potato fields. Indigenous pastors drew on Genesis in calling for good stewardship of the earth. Villagers on the slopes of Mt. Chimborazo showed how they are caring for their water supply as the glacier recedes. In this talk, I will present some Ecuador film clips and reflect on how perspectives from anthropology and studies of climate change communication can help shape a film that will effectively reach an audience that has been resistant to ‘mainstream’ environmentalist media.

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October 3 - Bruce Russell
Philosophy, Professor,
Solving the Abortion Problem

Abstract:

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October 4 - Kenneth Jackson
English, Professor and Chair
Shakespeare in the Age of STEM

Abstract:

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October 10 - Joseph Fitzgerald,
Psychology, Professor
The Well-Being of Gen X: A Developmental Examination

Abstract:

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October 11 - Steven L. Winter
Law School, Walter S. Gibbs Distinguished Professor
The Liturgy of Dissent

Abstract:

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October 17 - Marc W. Kruman
Center for the Study of Citizenship & History, Director and Professor,
Confederate Monuments

Abstract:

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October 18 - Alisa Moldavanova, Political Science, Assistant Professor; Nathaniel Wright, Political Science, Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University

Arts and Culture Nonprofits and Community Sustainability: Examining the Role of Organizational Strategy

Abstract:

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October 19 - Norah Duncan IV
Music, Chair
Music in Israel

Abstract:

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October 24 - Billicia Hines
Theatre, Director

The plays of August Wilsonwill be held Theatre auditorium, Old Main

Abstract:

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October 25 - Clay Walker, English, Lecturer; Adrienne Jenkens, English, Senior Lecturer; Nicole Varty, English, Lecturer,

Leveraging Personal Relationships with At-Risk Students

Abstract:

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October 26 - Fran Shor
History, Professor Emeritus

Trumpism, Culture War, and the White Working Class. (Co-sponsored by the Emeritus Academy)

Abstract:

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October 30 - Kypros Markou
Music, Professor and Director of University of Symphony

Performing Baroque music on modern instruments

Special Location, Day and time: Schaver Music Recital Hall, Monday at 5:30 p.m.*

Abstract:

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November 1 - Dominic P. Nanni
English, GTA

Students as Citizens: Encouraging Civic Engagement on College Campuses

Abstract:

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November 2 - Zachary W. Brewster, Sociology, Associate Professor, Gerald Nowak, Sociology, Junior Author

Racialized Workplaces, Modern Racist Attitudes, and Racial Stereotypes: A Recipe for Race-Based Restaurant Service.

Abstract:

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November 7 - Ewa Golebiowska
Political Science, Professor

Reexamining the link between education and political tolerance: Why are the well educated more tolerant?

Abstract:

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November 8 - Natalia Rakhin
Communication Sciences and Disorders, Associate Professor

Can typological differences between languages be related to genetic differences between their speakers?

Abstract:

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November 9 - Joshua Duchan
Music, Associate Professor

Billy Joel and the Beatles

Abstract:

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November 14 - Elizabeth Faue History, Professor and Chair

The Endangered Classroom: School Violence, Public Education, and Personal Safety in an Age of Privatization

Abstract:

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November 15 - Leonidas Pittos
Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Senior Lecturer

Mythology, Typology, and History in the Fiction of Alexandros Papadiamantis (1851-1911)

Abstract:

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November 16 - John Gruda
Independent Scholar

Tahirih: 19th Century Iranian Women’s Activist and Poet

Abstract:

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November 28 - Richard Raspa
English, Professor

Shakespeare’s King Lear and the Rhetoric of Death and Dying

Abstract:

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November 29 - Nicole Varty
English, Lecturer

What is an Ecological Model of Writing and How Can it Help Students Make Use of Their Knowledge?

Abstract:

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November 30 - Beth Fowler
Irvin D. Reid Honors College, Senior Lecturer

Billboard crossover hit songs in the 1950’s in the context of civil rights campaigns

Abstract:

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December 5 - Donyale Padgett, Associate Professor, Communication; Kevin Hardges, Graduate, Organizational Communication; and Taneá Menifee, Graduate, Organizational Communication

Communication and the Flint Water Crisis

Abstract:

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December 6 -Jonathan Flatley
English, Associate Professor

Like David Bowie

Abstract:

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December 7 - Daphne Ntiri
African American Studies, Professor

Literacy, race and gender: The growing presence of female African immigrants in Sweden’s transforming landscape

Abstract:

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January 16 - Jeffrey Kentor
Sociology, Chair

Reconceptualizing the Global Hierarchy 1850 – Present

Abstract:

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January 17 - Simone Chess
English, Associate Professor

Anorexia and Opting Out: Disability and Asexuality in Early Modern Texts

Abstract:

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January 18 - Amy Latawiec, English, Lecturer; Adrienne Jankens, English, Lecturer; Nicole Varty, English, Lecturer; Jule Thomas, English, Lecturer

A Composition Learning Community in Action: Perspectives from Students, Peer Mentors, and Instructors

Abstract:

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January 23 - Erik Mortenson

 

Janaury 24 - Richard Marback, English, Professor
Irvin D. Reid Honors College, Senior Lecturer

Translating the Counterculture: The Reception of the Beats in Turkey

Abstract:

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January 24 - Rahul MitraCommunication, Assistant Professor

TBA

Abstract:

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January 25 - Janet Hankin
Sociology, Professor

Donald Trump’s Health Care Reform

Abstract:

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January 30 - Haiyong Liu
Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Director of Linguistics Program

How to drop your object

Abstract:

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January 31 - Robin West Smith
Sociology, Adjunct Professor

The media representation of pensioners’ pension and health care costs in the Detroit bankruptcy

Abstract:

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February 1 - Ronald Aronson
History, Distinguished Professor Emeritus

We: Reviving Social Hope

Abstract:

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February 6 - Eric Montgomery, Adjunct Professor, Peace and Conflict Studies, Chris Vannier, African American Studies, University of Michigan

An Ethnography of a Vodu Shrine in Southern Togo: Of Spirit, Slave, and Sea

Abstract:

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February 7 - Tamara Bray
Anthropology, Professor

Partnering with Pots: The Work of Objects in the Imperial Inca Project

Abstract:

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February 13 - Tam Perry, Social Work, Assistant Professor, Jessica-Robbins Ruszkowski, Anthropology, Assistant Professor

Older Adults Understandings of the Flint Water Crisis"

Abstract:

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February 14 - Holly Feen-Calligan, Art and Art History, Associate Professor; Marilyn Zimmerwoman, Art and Art History, Associate Professor; Wendy Matthews, Music, Assistant Professor; Siobhan Gregory, Art and Art History, Senior Lecturer

Creating Connections with Art Based Service Learning

Abstract:

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February 20 - Charles Klahm
Criminal Justice, Assistant Professor

Razing Detroit: An exploratory analysis of the impact of concentrated demolitions on neighborhood- Level crime and social disorder

Abstract:

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February 21 - Elizabeth Dungee-Anderson
Social Work, Professor

TBA

Abstract:

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February 27 - Kim Schroeder
Library and Information Science, Lecturer

Detroit Music Oral Histories - Why Musicians Feel Detroit is a Hotbed of Talent

Abstract:

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February 28 - Leslie Tom
Detroit Revitalization Fellowship

Detroit Revitalization Fellowship

Abstract:

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March 6 - Richard Smith
Social Work, Associate Professor

TBA

Abstract:

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March 7 - Stephen Chrisomalis, Anthropology, Associate Professor; Allison Hebel, Anthropology, Master’s Student

Transformations in English numericals: the case of dozen and score

Abstract:

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March 20 - Yuning(Bonnie) Wu
Criminal Justice, Associate Professor

From supervisory procedural justice to officer procedural justice: An empirical study of Chinese police officers

Abstract:

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March 21 - Wendy Matthews
Music, Assistant Professor

Breaking the brass ceiling: A descriptive multiple-case study of contemporary professional women brass players

Abstract:

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March 22 - Jun Sung Hong
Social Work, Assistant Professor

TBA

Abstract:

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March 27 - Jose Cuello
Latino/Latina Studies, Associate Professor

TBA

Abstract:

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March 28 - Robert Sedler
Law School, Distinguished Professor

Our 18th century Constitution, Congress, the President, and the Two-Party Political System

Abstract:

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April 3 - Deanna Laurette
English, GTA

Representation, Communication, and Curated Identities: An Examination of Online Support Groups for People with Disabilities

Abstract:

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April 4 - Barrett Watten
English, Professor

Poetics as Knowledge Base; or, Against Poeticity as Such

Abstract:

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April 10 - Michael Kralr
Social Work, Associate Professor

Indigenizing Suicide Prevention: The Story of Inuit in Arctic Canada

Abstract:

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April 11 - Amy Ann Latawiec
English, Lecturer

Piloting a “Stretch” Curriculum: A Longitudinal Study of Basic Writing, Student Dispositions, and the Definition of Success

Abstract:

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April 17 - renee c. hoogland
English, Professor

Nancy Mitchnick’s Uncalibrated Figuration

Abstract:

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